Saturday, Oct 24, 2020

ToT Tso'i - Trail of Tears Three

Jackson, MO Tso'i Challenge, 1/2 Marathon, 10K, 5K

This Event Took Place Sat. Oct 24, 2020

Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT IS THE TERRAIN AND COURSE LIKE?
The courses take place mostly on single track trail with some stints on roadways. Expect steep hills for both climbs and descents, occasional high bluffs, rocks, roots, dirt, possible wildlife and beautiful scenery.

WHAT SWAG DO WE GET?
Must finish event to receive goodies 5k- Swiftwick socks 10k - Tso'i Bandana, 13.1 - Tso'i Hoody

Race Details

There will be a designated start time for each distance: 5k 8:00 am, 10k 9:00 am, 13.1 Mile 11:15 am. Yes, this is a shorter gap between races than previous years. We will not have an awards ceremony after the events. Once results of each race have been calculated you may pick up awards at a designated location. We are asking all participants to socially distance before, between and after races. Also, we may have some prepackaged food items available, but will not have our normal layout of food and beverage. Aid stations were already minimal, but even more so this year. If you will need nutrition along the course pack it yourself do not rely on the aid stations for wanted items. Masks will be required at bib pickup and anytime social distancing cannot be maintained.
AGE GROUPS: Open Division: 0-39 Male & Female, Masters Division: 40-49 Male & Female, Seniors: 50-59 Male & Female, Grand Masters: 60+ Male & Female




No Refunds or Transfers

EVENT SPONSORS: Missouri Running Company, Tailwind Nutrition, Squirrel's Nut Butter, Minglewood Brewery

WHAT IS THE HISTORY OF TRAIL OF TEARS STATE PARK?

WHAT IS THE HISTORY OF TRAIL OF TEARS STATE PARK?
In 1830, President Andrew Jackson passed the Indian Removal Act, which called for the removal of American Indians living east of the Mississippi River to relocate west of the Mississippi River. Trail of Tears State Park commemorates the Cherokee Removal.
While some of the Cherokees left on their own, more than 16,000 were forced out against their will. In winter 1838-39, an endless procession of wagons, horsemen and people on foot traveled 800 miles west to Indian Territory. Others traveled by boat along river routes. Most of the Cherokee detachments made their way through Cape Girardeau County, home of Trail of Tears State Park. While there, the Indians endured brutal conditions; they dealt with rain, snow, freezing cold, hunger and disease. Floating ice stopped the attempted Mississippi River crossing, so the detachments had to set up camps on both sides of the river. It is estimated that over 4,000 Cherokees lost their lives on the march, nearly a fifth of the population.
Legend says that Nancy Bushyhead Walker Hildebrand died and was buried within the park’s boundaries. She was the sister of Rev. Jesse Bushyhead, who led one of the detachments, and the wife of Lewis Hildebrand, who led another. Her two children traveled on and made it to Indian Territory. The Bushyhead Memorial in the park is a tribute to her and all the other Cherokee who died on the trail. Trail of Tears State Park is a certified site on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. The park’s visitor center features exhibits that interpret the forced relocation, as well as the park’s many natural features.
The park preserves the native woodlands much as they appeared to the Cherokee. Mature forests cover much of the park, which is characterized by sharp ridges and steep ravines. Located directly on the Mississippi River, visitors can view the plentiful wildlife, including white-tailed deer, turkeys, hawks and foxes. The large trees on the bluffs and cliffs along the river are noted as winter roosting sites for bald eagles.
Source: https://mostateparks.com/page/55010/general-information

Local time: 3:33 PM
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